Format Hardcover
Publication Date 10/17/08
ISBN 9781605980119
Trim Size / Pages 8.6 x 5.8 in / 208

Request a review copy or press kit

The Tragedy of Macbeth Part II

The Seed of Banquo

Noah Lukeman

In 1610, The Tragedy of Macbeth was first performed. 400 years later: the sequel, written as a five-act play in blank verse.

Ten years king, Malcolm sits on an uneasy throne. If Malcolm’s mind is haunted by the ghosts of his royal father (“gracious Duncan”) as well as the thane and lady who so bloodily betrayed him, Malcolm’s soul is sickened, as was Macbeth’s, by the witches’ prophecy that from Banquo’s seed would spring a line of Scottish kings: a prophecy that remained unfulfilled at the end of Shakespeare’s play. The witches also taunt Malcolm with riddles all his own: that sorrows will visit him from Ireland (where his younger brother fled upon their father’s death); that his love for Macbeth will breed fresh treachery. True to the Shakespearean model, its devious plot unfolding in five acts and its speech set to the measure of blank verse, Macbeth, Part II, draws bold the tragedy of a powerful man undone by the terrors he imagines and the truths he fails to see.

Noah Lukeman is the author of several bestselling books on the craft of writing, among them A Dash of Style: The Art and Mastery of Punctuation. Noah lives in New York City, where he runs a literary agency.

Buy it now in print: Amazon Barnes & Noble

Buy it now in ebook: Amazon Barnes & Noble Apple Kobo

Endorsements & Reviews

“An audacious achievement. ‘Blood will have blood,’ wrote Shakespeare, and Lukeman steers us back into the red, raging thick of it, exploring—in blank verse, no less—the murderous fallout from the original Macbeth.” Jennifer Lee Carrell, author of the New York Times bestseller Interred With Their Bones
“Shakespeare lives on because we find his thoughts in our blood. Noah Lukeman's bold sequel to Macbeth, written in blank verse, is a fierce, memory-ridden love letter to Shakespeare, and an enthralling reminder that, in our imagination, Shakespeare's greatest plays have no end.” Nigel Cliff, author of The Shakespeare Riots: Revenge, Drama, and Death in Nineteenth-Century America