Format Hardcover
Publication Date 12/06/10
ISBN 9781605981741
Trim Size / Pages 8.6 x 5.8 in / 144

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Stieg Larsson

Our Days in Stockholm

Kurdo Baksi

An intimate memoir that provides a unique perspective on the life and legacy of Stieg Larsson, author of The Millennium Trilogy.

“He was both a dream and a nightmare to work with. He was not only involved in the struggle against intolerance, he was obsessed with it” are the words used to describe the now world-famous author Stieg Larsson by his friend and close colleague, Kurdo Baksi, who himself was a prominent character in The Millennium Trilogy. During Larsson’s career as a journalist he was a crucial figure in the battle against racism and for democracy in Sweden as one of the founders of the anti-fascist magazine Expo. Baksi first met Larsson in 1992, triggering an intense friendship and a fruitful, but challenging, working relationship.

in this candid memoir, Baksi answers the questions a multitude of Larsson’s fans have already asked about his childhood, the recurring death tretas, his insomnia, his vices, and his feminism—so evident in his books— as well as his own personal dogma. What was he like as an individual and author? Who provided the inspiration for his now-immortal characters (Baksi is one of the few who appears in the trilogy as himself), and of course, who was Lisbeth Salander?

Kurdo Baksi was born in 1965 in northern Kurdistan and moved to Sweden in 1980. He first published the magazine Rash U Spi (“Black and White”) in 1987, which deals with racial issues across Europe. He is the author of ten books on human rights, racism, emigration and exile, and in 2000 he was awarded the Olaf Palme Peace Prize.

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Endorsements & Reviews

“Not a full-length bio in any sense, this quirky, oddly compelling memoir presents Larsson as a man consumed by a passion…Egalitarian to the bone, he was a workaholic who wrote fiction for fun but knew it was good. On the surface unassuming, he intended to change the world.” USA Today