Format Hardcover
Publication Date 01/07/14
ISBN 9781605985381
Trim Size / Pages 9.3 x 6.4 in / 368

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The Story of Music

From Babylon to the Beatles: How Music Has Shaped Civilization

Howard Goodall

A dynamic and expansive tour through 40,000 years of music, from prehistoric instruments to modern-day pop songs.

Music is an intrinsic part of everyday life, and yet the history of its development from single notes to multi-layered orchestration can seem bewilderingly complex. In his dynamic tour through 40,000 years of music, from prehistoric instruments to modern-day pop, Howard Goodall leads us through the story of music as it happened, idea by idea, so that each musical innovation—harmony, notation, sung theatre, the orchestra, dance music, recording—strikes us with its original force. Along the way, he also gives refreshingly clear descriptions of what music is and how it works: what scales are all about, why some chords sound discordant, and what all post-war pop songs have in common. The story of music is the story of our urge to invent, connect, rebel—and entertain. Howard Goodall's beautifully clear and compelling account is both a hymn to human endeavor and a groundbreaking map of our musical journey.

Howard Goodall is an EMMY, BRIT and BAFTA award-winning composer of choral music, stage musicals, film and TV scores, and a distinguished broadcaster. In recent years he has been England’s first ever National Ambassador for Singing, the Classical Brit Composer of the Year and Classic FM’s Composer-in-Residence. He was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2011 New Year Honours for services to music education.

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Endorsements & Reviews

“A lively zip through some forty-five millennia, jumping back and forth between classical, folk, and pop.” The Sunday Times - London
“Now comes Howard Goodall and everyone's prayers are answered. He starts right at the beginning, with 25,000-year-old bone flutes. A racily written, learned, and often shrewdly insightful book.” The Daily Telegraph